What follows are real-life examples of individuals who have overcome their addictions and are moving on with their lives. As we showed in our Before and After Meth campaign, drugs can drastically change a person's appearance. With hard work and dedication to sobriety, it's possible to come back from the brink.
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The above imagery paints a harrowing picture of how devastating the use of various methamphetamines can be. Think we're being overly dramatic? Think again. Meth has been called the world's most dangerous drug and many U.S. cities, particularly across the Midwest, now consider it the most serious drug problem they face. In 2009, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) released findings concluding that some 1.2 million Americans over the age of twelve had abused methamphetamine in the last 12-month period. A year later, a report published by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) indicated some 13 million people were thought to have abused methamphetamine during their lives.

Whether you have come to our site because you are personally struggling, have a friend or family member that is, or need a cautionary tale about the dangers of meth abuse, you're not alone: more than a million people have visited this page and more than 7 million people had seen the imagery at the time this accompanying article was written. If you, a friend or family member has a problem with meth use, we urge you to get help, either by calling our toll-free helpline at 1-888-341-7785 to find a reputable methamphetamine rehab program, or using some other trusted source of your choosing. Just don't put it off.

How old are you?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

25

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

34

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

24

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

26

Kristine Capps

Answer:

27

Kristy Dauberman / Smith

Answer:

0

When did you first try alcohol?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

Around the ages of 12-14 but I never really drank much. Alcohol was never something I depended on or even enjoyed.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

10

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

14

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

13

Kristine Capps

Answer:

12

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

When did you first try drugs?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

About age 14 I smoked pot. About two months later I started doing meth.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

13

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

14

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

13

Kristine Capps

Answer:

14

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What was the first drug you tried, was peer pressure a factor? What made you want to try?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

I tried marijuana first, as most people do. I don't think it was peer pressure. I just think I would have found my way there regardless. I was fascinated by drugs at an early age and found myself seeking out those

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

Marijuana, I would say yes to peer pressure, and I tried it because I thought i'd look cool.

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

alcohol. i tried it at parties and stuff like that. i just wanted to because everyone else said it was fun i suppose

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

Weed. I was just curious about it so I tried it and I liked it.

Kristine Capps

Answer:

Pot, I suppose I just did it because everyone of my friends was.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What was the first drug you became addicted to?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

Meth was the first drug I can say I 'loved.' This was the first drug that made me do things I didn't think I was capable of.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

Marijuana

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

meth

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

Opiates.

Kristine Capps

Answer:

meth

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

Describe your addiction progression, how it began and where it ended before you got help?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

I did drugs from an early age and I can honestly say I was an 'instant-addict.' I loved it. I needed it. It was the only thing that ever made me feel complete and calm. It was the only time I felt I could function. It was the only way I would even want to be alive. I was an extremely heavy user. It was about three years into the pill addiction that I became addicted to needles as well. I worked a normal job (Realtor/Property manager) for the most part of my addiction. In the last year, I stopped going to doctors because I had been red-flagged everywhere so I was forced to buy pills off the street and I no longer had the income I did from selling my pills. I soon lost my job. I began having medical problems. My liver is shot. I developed gallstones which were subsequently removed. I had several seizures and experienced respiratory failure and repeated blood infections from abcesses. After all of my life unraveling, my family knew what was going on. I was Marchman Acted (served a petition for involuntary treatment.) I went to detox over and over and over. I checked into rehab (court ordered) after I messed up out-patient over and over. It was at this point that I really wanted to give up drugs- I just didn't know how. I really did try. After about a dozen detox trips and three failed rehab attempts I checked into ACTS (Tarpon Springs) for the last time. I stayed in detox 45 days and rehab 180. Before rehab, I had lost EVERYTHING and everyone. I contemplated suicide over and over.I didn't see a way for my life to ever become managable. After a little time my head cleared and I was able to process thoughts rationally. - I can't say this enough- REHAB SAVED MY LIFE- there is no doubt in my mind that I would be dead.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

I would say it began at age 13 with marijuana, I dropped out of school at 16, I experimented with all types of drugs including acid, meth, coke, Xanax, pain pills, I started doing meth and coke real bad between 17 and around 24, at the age of 24 I got a prescription for pain killers for my hip dysplasia, started out popping them, then snorting, then I 2010, I started shooting them, lost everything, then my family did a Marchman Act on me, and I have been sober since July 13, 2011.

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

at first i just tried whatever drugs and eventually i becme addicted to meth as time progressed i also dabbled in pills. i was arrested several times and temporarily lost custody of my kids.

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

It started out pretty harmless and just kept progressing on and on until I was finally out of contact with my friends. My family soon stopped helping me. I was eventually court ordered into rehab on a Marchman Act.

Kristine Capps

Answer:

It happened pretty fast I guess. I just got involved with my ex or my boyfriend (whatever you want to call him) he was arrested a lot and before he did his last stint in prison (before the term he is currently serving which is life without parole) DCF took my kids away and I had to get clean if I wanted to see them.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

When did people first notice it was becoming a problem?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

I kept it pretty under control for a while but eventually I lost all of my stuff which was a lot because I worked and I came from an affluent family. It all split at the seams so quickly. My family was so concerned when I was sick all the time (withdraws, etc.), never had any money, and constantly had track marks. I could no longer hold a job or even present myself as a normal human being because my appearance and health had deteriorated so badly and I was unable to focus or talk about anything else.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

I would say around the age 24, it was effecting my work, even my boss at the time noticed.

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

when i distanced myself from everything else

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

When I started using needles

Kristine Capps

Answer:

When I was about 21 or 22

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

How did you finance your habit?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

Doctor shopping, selling my own pills, insurance and pharmacy fraud, working. Basically however I could.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

For a while I worked, then I couldn't or didn't care to get a job so I sold pills, traded pills, ripped people off.

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

work, men, crime, my family, whatever

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

A variety of ways. Doctor shopping, stealing, scamming.

Kristine Capps

Answer:

Mostly theft or schemes perpetrated with my ex

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

How long were you actively addicted (using heavily)?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

I was using heavily between the ages of 16-22. Even if I wasn't on pills I was on something.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

I would say for about 5 or 6 years.

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

Over 5 years

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

About 7 years

Kristine Capps

Answer:

about 5 years

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

Was there ever a point where you realized you had become addicted?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

When I could not go even a few hours without pills. I had no money and I couldn't even sleep through the night without getting up and doing pills. I couldn't keep a job. I had alienated myself and was completely diluted in my thoughts.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

Yes, right before my mom Marchmen acted me, and the reason being, my family had takin my daughter, and at the time I was only worried about my next fix, not my daughter. that's when I realized I was gone!

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

when I let drugs take priority over my children.

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

Pretty early on actually. I just didn't care to do anything about it.

Kristine Capps

Answer:

Of course. It was early on.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

Did your drug use ever cause you to commit crimes?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

Yes, I tell people all the time that I'm allergic to drugs- I break out in handcuffs... Here's the thing: I wasn't in trouble every single time I did drugs but I was on drugs every single time I got in trouble. My crimes range from embezzlement all the way down to bad checks. I was never prosecuted for any of the doctor shopping or fraud.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

Yes

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

it did, yes

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

I do have a criminal record.

Kristine Capps

Answer:

Yes, mostly theft.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What was it that made you get help?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

I had no other choice. I had to or I was going to die. I was so unhappy and I just couldn't do it anymore. I made a conscience effort not to go back to that life. My family was destroyed and my relationship was in shambles.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

My parents Marchmen acted me.

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

my kids

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

I was ordered to

Kristine Capps

Answer:

Losing my kids

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

Did you have an intervention?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

Sort of... I was Marchman Acted so the cops basically just came and picked me up. I would leave detox or rehab and they would come get me again, take me to jail, then rehab.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

Not really, the cops picked me up.

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

not really

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

Through the courts but not really how one would think of an intervention to be.

Kristine Capps

Answer:

not really

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

If you had a rock bottom, what was it?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

I had nothing. Absoutly nothing. I was ALWAYS sick. My mom was devastated. Her and I are very close and that hurt me a lot.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

My rock bottom was losing my daughter.

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

my parents had my kids and i knew i needed to get them back

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

I just got tired of being sick all the time.

Kristine Capps

Answer:

losing my kids

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What treatment did you receive? Where? For How Long?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

Detox about 12 times (ranging from 3-7 days each time) at Bartow detox through the Tri0county program (polk, highlands, and hardee)

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

I went to detox, and then to Acts rehab. for 5 months.

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

in-jail treatment

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

In-jail treatment, Phoenix House, ACTS inpatient,

Kristine Capps

Answer:

I didn't go to rehab or anything but I did do JASA which is like an in-jail rehab thing.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

Did you relapse?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

Yes. I was in and out of treatment. I just had to keep going back. At some point I got tired of seeing those around me knowing one day I would be them. There was also a girl I used to hang out with a lot and do pills. Her and I were SO similar and I saw some of the horrible things that happened to her and how far of a fall she took and I knew it wasnt just a matter that I could be her it was that in time I would be her.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

No

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

when i left rehab i started drinking a lot and it was sort of scary so i had to stop

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

Each time I just went back to jail and started from day one again

Kristine Capps

Answer:

I used on and off in and out of jail for about 2 years.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What do you think the biggest thing you have learned through recovery has been?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

It gave me faith that people can and sometimes do change. It also showed me a very detailed picture of my life if I didn't stop.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

That I have had a lot of things in the past that made me want to use to not have to think about it or feel it, and that I do not need to cover those things up with drugs, I am strong enough to deal with it, and that nobody but myself is to blame for my using.

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

how important my family is

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

patience

Kristine Capps

Answer:

N/A

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

If you could talk to your old self, before your addiction, what would you say to them?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

I'd tell myself that it would never be enough. I would never have enough drugs to satisfy my cravings. I would explain how complicated and heart-breaking the experience would be. I would warn myself that I have this demon in me and I would remind myself that I AM stronger than whatever this thing is inside of me.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

That it may seem like fun, like you have no worrys when using, but it is not worth it, you lose to many things, to many years.

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

i do not know

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

I'd tell them how hard it is to come back from something like this.

Kristine Capps

Answer:

It's not worth it.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What have been the hardest parts of recovery and sobriety for you?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

The hardest part for me is living with things I've done. It's hard that people still think of me as the person I was. It's hard learning to accept that the person I'm talking about is me.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

The hardest part was accepting that I was responsible for my actions, and sobriety for me would be getting into the real world having a real job, not living in a fantasy world.

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

learning to cope differently

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

Learning that some people may never forgive me.

Kristine Capps

Answer:

Living without my kids, losing my signifigant other even though he wasn't the best person, my kids don't have a father now because he is going to be incarcerated for the rest of his life.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What has changed about you since you got sober?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

I am better at managing my finances. I'm more genuine. I have so much better of a relationship with my family and my SO.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

I have become the loving and caring and responsible person I used to be.

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

im a better mom

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

I'm calmer and more trustworthy

Kristine Capps

Answer:

I'm more thoughtful

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What parts of life seem different now, what things do you notice now that you didnt while you were using?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

A lot. It seems like my mind was so filled with drugs that I was constantly in this 'survival mode' and never noticed anything around me. It's a little different to have a real routine and plan things. I've also noticed how obnoxious druggies can be.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

That I actually enjoy being sober, I enjoy just spending time with family and working, normal things seem pleasurable.

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

i notice how important some things are that i previously ignored

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

N/A

Kristine Capps

Answer:

I didn't notice much of anything when I was using.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

How has your desire for drugs/alcohol changed as you have been sober?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

It's different. I still think about using and occasionally have dreams about it. I don't think the case is that I want to get high. I want the desire to go away, which may never happen.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

It has changed a lot, I have no desire to use at all anymore. I enjoy life without it.

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

i dont want to do drugs now

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

I know the consenquences

Kristine Capps

Answer:

I still like the feeling drugs give me. Just not the effects it causes.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

For those who aren’t able to recover, why do you they weren’t able to?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

A variety of reasons. Some have mental issues. Some are just surrounded by it. Some are too scared to get help and some flat out don't want it. You can't just quit because someone wants you to. You have to want it. A lot of people want to get clean and be sober but they don't actually want to be sober. They want to want it. Does that make any sense?

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

Because they didn't want to change, also maybe they didn't have a supportive family

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

they didnt try hard enough. anyone can recover.

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

maybe they just didnt trust the plan enough

Kristine Capps

Answer:

Maybe they just didn't want it bad enough.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

How did your family deal with your addiction before you got help?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

They enabled a lot unfortunately. They became very suspicious and concerned.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

They didn't deal well towards the end, they were fighting with me, with each other, they were pretty much done with me.

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

they didnt trust me

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

shunned me, very disapointed.

Kristine Capps

Answer:

We didn't speak.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

In what negative ways did your addiction impact your family?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

They didn't trust me. We couldn't spend time together. I was always too trashed to enjoy anything or even care to carry on a conversation.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

it seperated me from my kids but i have them back now

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

I'm back in contact with most of my family

Kristine Capps

Answer:

How has this resolved after you got clean? I lost my kids but I'm still not very close with my family.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

How have they reacted to your sobriety?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

Wonderfully. They are so proud and happy for me.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

its been great

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

great

Kristine Capps

Answer:

Positivly. I've spoke to them several times.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

How do you think enabling behavior (them enabling your addiction) by family members figures into addiction? did it with yours?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

It did a lot. It was kinda negative because I could just ask for money and go get drugs all the time so I took advantage of it. I also took advantage of the fact that no one really wanted to say anything bad so they just went along with it.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

yes. my parents gave me things because they didnt want to face the problem and create drama by saying no

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

a little because my parents would help me with things but at a certain point they cut me off

Kristine Capps

Answer:

Not really. I didn't have family to support me.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What would you say to the family or friends of an addict who wants them to get help? What is the best thing they can do?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

I'm not sure. Nothing worked for me until I wanted it.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

not to enable their addiction

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

Not sure

Kristine Capps

Answer:

That's hard to answer because most friends of addicts are addicts too and its hard to see drug use without doing it as well.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What can former addicts do to get a new start?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

I moved 1,300 miles away but the best thing for me was to change the people places and things I was familiar with. I had to change every part of my life. Everything had to be different for me.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

meet new people

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

Live differently

Kristine Capps

Answer:

Cut ties to everything.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

How does your past addiction and related issues (criminal record if you have one) impact your life currently?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

It makes it hell of a lot harder to get a job. I think it makes people unfairly judge me. I have horrible credit and I'm still sorting out an identity theft situation that I'm sure was done by someone I knew in FL.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

makes it harder to get a job and explain myself, being a felon.

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

it makes it so much harder to explain my criminal history to employers.

Kristine Capps

Answer:

It's hard to get a job. I'm on probation for 5 more years. I can't drive a car. I can't get financing for anything.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What motivates you to stay sober?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

Thinking about how misrible the alternative is. Thinking about the improvements I've made to my life. Knowing that I probably don't have the strength to go through recovery again.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

my kids and my family

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

My Family

Kristine Capps

Answer:

Trying to get my kids back.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What tricks/techniques/tips do you use when you are having an especially hard time staying clean?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

I never really thought about it.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

think about how much harder life was before

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

N/A

Kristine Capps

Answer:

Thinking of my kids.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What, if any, does the role of God or spirituality play in your sobriety?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

I am not a very religious or spiritual person.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

i do believe in god

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

A big one.

Kristine Capps

Answer:

I'm very religious.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

Out of all the anti-drug messages out there, do you think any of them work? What do you think of the faces of meth campaign? Do you think it is effective?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

Faces of meth is a REALLY good one. It shows facts not some stupid warning that people don't take seriously. Like that commercial where the guys smoking a joint and hits a little girl with his car going through a drive through. This does not work. We are not stupid. We know pot isn't going to inhibit your thoughts so much that you run over a kid. Giving out all those 'scary drug info' things is not going to work. It pretty much seems like Reefer Madness (the movie) all over again.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

faces of meth works

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

not many are effective.

Kristine Capps

Answer:

I think people will probably still do drugs if they want to.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What do you think are the best ways to help current addicts?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

Show them that they do have a chance. The only people who were ever able to get through to me were addicts themselves. I think we take their stories more seriously because they know what it's like. They've been in that dungeon before.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

rehab

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

talk to them and be able to relate

Kristine Capps

Answer:

Not Sure

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What do you think are the best ways to stop kids from ever trying drugs?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

I'm not sure. I don't think anything would have stopped me from even trying them. Maybe if they saw the lives that addicts lead. It's not pretty.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

i dont know what would have stopped me form doing drugs

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

Not sure

Kristine Capps

Answer:

Show them real addicts and how screwed up their lives actually are.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What would you say to casual drug users?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

We all thought we were casual users at one point. You will not realize you're a hardcore drug user until it's too late and you're already addicted.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

to be careful

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

Not sure

Kristine Capps

Answer:

N/A

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What do you think about the way the current legal system deals with addicts?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

I don't know what to make of this one because yes, some of these people are bad and need to be put in jail but a lot are suffering from mental issues and genuinely need help. I think there should be more funding for substance abuse treatment since most addicts can't afford rehab or detox. They're so broke they can't afford help and if they can, they often just spend the money on drugs anyway.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

i think its good they have in jail rehab programs to do in exchange for a lighter sentance

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

they should get more help instead of just punishment.

Kristine Capps

Answer:

I hate it

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

Do you think addiction is a criminal issue, or a public health issue?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

Public health. I don't think many of these crimes would have been committed without the perpetrator being on drugs thus making the user not a criminal. They just genuinely need help. They are sick.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

criminal

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

both

Kristine Capps

Answer:

both

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What do you think is the root cause of most addiction?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

People use drugs for so many reasons.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

genetics

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

not sure

Kristine Capps

Answer:

I think there are many causes.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

How do you think trauma from one’s past influences addiction?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

Absolutely, it could be the only way they know how to cope with their thoughts or feelings. I see this a lot.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

N/A

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

N/A

Kristine Capps

Answer:

I've had a lot of bad things happen and drugs always helped me forget.

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

What drugs do you think are the most dangerous? The least? What types of addiction seem underreported or go unnoticed most from your perspective?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

Meth and pills are the most dangerous I think. Meth because it makes you so crazy and pills because the physical addiction is so bad. I guess the least would be weed. Opiate addiction goes unnoticed a lot because unless you are REALLY high or in withdraw there really aren't many 'tells'

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

i think alcohol is very dangerous even though it is legal. most people dont see it as a hard core addiction but it easily can be.

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

I think any drug involving needles makes it automatically worse.

Kristine Capps

Answer:

N/A

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

Do you have anything else you want to say?

Toni Wasden

Answer:

I can't even begin to explain how much help rehab is. Not even just because the treatment. Because the time you have to clear your head is so valuable. You can't think right for a while after using and PAWS can go on for a long time.

Chris Morrison

Answer:

0

Christie Deweese

Answer:

0

Jessica Sheridan

Answer:

N/A

Chelsea Thompson

Answer:

N/A

Kristine Capps

Answer:

N/A

KristyDauberman/Smith

Answer:

0

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