A Glass of Wine is Good for Your Health… Just Kidding

Last updated on November 4th, 2019

Remember when medical experts agreed that drinking a small amount of alcohol could boost cardiovascular health? Well, those days are over.

As it turns out, a new study discovered that consuming even a small amount of alcohol can negatively impact health.

Published in the British Medical Journal, the detailed study shocked a large portion of the U.S. population by announcing that alcohol consumption offers no health benefits. Current Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that if you choose to drink alcohol, women should not exceed one drink per day, while men should not exceed two drinks in one day.

The detailed study shocked a large portion of the U.S. population by announcing that alcohol consumption offers no health benefits.

When asked how previous research could have gotten it so wrong, researchers could only speculate. The most popular theory is that the results from past studies were skewed. People who drink less are more likely to lead healthier lifestyles overall, with balanced diets and exercise.

Making the Case for Alcohol Abstinence

Scientists from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University College London, and University of Pennsylvania dug through hundreds of previously conducted alcohol research studies. Once the cases were gathered for evaluation, researchers combed through the drinking habits of 250,000 people in 56 separate studies.

Results of the painstaking research include:

  • People who abstain or consume small amounts of alcohol generally enjoy better heart health
  • Surprisingly small amounts of alcohol can cause negative health effects
  • Some people are born with a genetic disposition to drink less
  • Long-term consumption of small amounts of alcohol can lead to heart disease and/or stroke
  • Those who avoid alcohol have normal blood pressure
  • People drinking minimal amounts of alcohol tend to be of a healthy weight and have lower body mass indexes

“It appears that even if you’re a light drinker, reducing your alcohol consumption could be beneficial for your heart,” said Juan Casas, senior author and professor of epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Authors of the study hope it will play an integral role in influencing government policy on alcohol consumption and overall health.


Also Read: We Can Predict Future Binge Drinking Teenagers

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