Males More Likely to Cheat When Drinking, Study Shows

Last updated on November 4th, 2019

A new study suggests that males might be more likely to cheat on their significant others after imbibing spirits. According to the findings published by the National Academy of Science, alcohol affects the part of the brain responsible for social bonding differently in male and female prairie voles. This may hold significance for both those who struggle with alcohol abuse and their spouses.

Prairie voles make excellent subjects for studying social relationships because they mate for life. They also happen to prefer alcoholic beverages over plain water – in this case a 10:1 mixture of H2O and ethanol. Some of the voles received alcohol, while the other half were given water.

It turned out that when male prairie voles get drunk, they are more likely to curl up with a strange female vole. (It is important to note that his behavior is indicative of mating in rodents.) Meanwhile the male voles that drank water preferred their mating partner over another female.

To make matters more interesting, female voles that drank alcohol would still rather cuddle with their mate over a stranger. Therefore it seems that alcohol may affect the male and female brain differently.

A neurochemical analysis showed that the release of neuropeptide Y and corticotropin was altered after drinking alcohol during cohabitation. After drinking alcoholic beverages, the rodents’ brains released chemicals differently during social situations.

So this is not an excuse to get drunk and cheat on your girlfriend. However since there are similarities between the brains of rodents and humans, it could mean that men are more likely to do so after a bout of drinking.Of course the scientific study conducted by Allison M.J. Anacker and her colleagues was tested on prairie voles and not humans. So this is not an excuse to get drunk and cheat on your girlfriend. However since there are similarities between the brains of rodents and humans, it could mean that men are more likely to do so after a bout of drinking. Women dating an alcoholic may already be able to attest to this.

It is the first evidence to prove that alcohol affects social bonding through neural mechanisms. The alcohol altered the part of the vole brain responsible for social behavior differently between genders. This is the first step in identifying ways to prevent the harmful effects of alcohol abuse on relationships.

If you or someone you know is struggling with alcoholism, consider looking for alcohol abuse treatment center options in your area.

Addiction can cost up to $200 per day.

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