Man Hallucinates Bear Attack on Bad MDMA Trip

Last updated on November 4th, 2019

Thanks to a dangerous hallucinogen, one Vermont man went on a “trip” last week that will forever change multiple lives.

Lucas Gingras and his girlfriend, Ladonna Merriman, originally set out to spend some quality time at a Milton-based cabin in the woods. After dosing himself with MDMA – and secretly spiking Merriman’s drink with the same hallucinogen – things quickly went downhill, coming to an abrupt halt with Merriman in the hospital and Gingras facing charges of arson and attempted murder.

According to local police, Gingras, 28, began to hallucinate shortly after taking MDMA, also known as ecstasy or Molly. Gingras claims he heard a noise outside, as if something was trying to break in the cabin. Believing there was a large and deadly grizzly bear stalking the campers, Gingras panicked.

Gingras pleaded with Merriman, assuring her that jumping off the 70-foot cliff was her only option for safety.Allegedly gripped by fear, Gingras forced Merriman out of the cabin and running blindly into the darkened woods. Once the duo made it to a steep cliff, Gingras pleaded with Merriman, assuring her that jumping off the 70-foot cliff was her only option for safety.

After his girlfriend went over the edge, Gingras allegedly made his way back to the cabin, set it on fire, and walked down a pathway to where Merriman’s injured body lay. He then dragged her three-quarters of a mile to a truck, where he left her to go seek help, police said.

Gingras later returned to the scene with a rifle. Convinced the bear found its way into the truck’s cab, he fired several rounds into the truck’s bed as Merriman lay in the front seat with a broken back and punctured lung.

Gingras later told police he thinks the MDMA caused him to hallucinate the presence of a bear.


Also Read: The LSD Experience Illustrated with Self-Portraits

MDMA and Hallucinations

Molly is known to cause certain side effects, like impairing judgment skills, creating a false sense of affection, and bringing on severe confusion. Hallucinations, though not commonly associated with this particular drug, are also possible.

Hallucinations come in two different forms: auditory (hearing) and visual (seeing). For those abusing MDMA on a frequent basis, around half will potentially experience hallucinations.

How Does Molly Cause Hallucinations?

When using MDMA, visual hallucinations are more common than their auditory counterparts. Experts believe the hallucinations are a result of noradrenergic activity and MDMA’s effect on the transportation of serotonin in the brain.

Though rare, documented cases clearly exhibit the possibility of MDMA-related hallucinations. In October 2010, for example, a 17-year old girl with no previous psychiatric issues took a single dose of MDMA. Moments after taking the drug, she began to hallucinate and her speech became grossly impaired – mimicking the signs and symptoms of someone with schizophrenia. The effects lasted for days, leading experts to coin the term “MDMA-induced psychotic disorder.”


Also Read: The Complete History of Ecstasy

Does your insurance cover addiction treatment?

Use our free and confidential online insurance checker to see if your insurance covers treatment at an American Addiction Center facility.

See if you’re covered