Infographic: The No. 1 Date Rape Drug is 100% Legal

Last updated on December 12th, 2019

In the wake of sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, the conversation has abruptly moved away from the misconduct allegations and towards the question of whether Kavanaugh drank too much (or even lied about it before the Senate Judiciary Committee).

Earlier this summer, Dr. Christine Blasey Ford wrote a confidential letter to a senior Democratic lawmaker alleging that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her more than three decades ago. In her opening statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 27, Dr. Ford said, “For a very long time, I was too afraid and ashamed to tell anyone the details [of the assault]. I did not want to tell my parents that I, at age 15, was in a house without any parents present, drinking beer with boys.”

Alcohol and Its Link to Sexual Assault

Alcohol is often used by perpetrators as an excuse for their actions. It’s also used as a loophole to shift responsibility for the assault away from themselves and onto the survivor. While intoxication may make someone physically and/or mentally less able to resist an assault, it is vital to remember one thing: an inability or unwillingness to resist does not make an assault the survivor’s fault.

With the topics of alcohol and sexual assault dominating both national media and social media conversations, the eradication of misinformation is paramount. With that in mind, we’re proud to present part one of an infographic series examining the role alcohol plays in sexual assault.

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Additional Reading:  The Role of Drugs and Alcohol in Sexual Assault.

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